Global Chaucers in UVA and DC

by CANDACE BARRINGTON and JONATHAN HSY

The Global Chaucers co-directors are currently in UVA! We’ll be appearing at the Scholars’ Lab on Thursday to discuss “Digital Hospitality” and the Medieval Colloquium on Friday for a workshop on “Linguistic and Cultural Hospitality.” More than ever, we are hoping this project can create a more empathetic, culturally aware, and interconnected world.

We the co-directors also proud to be taking part in an interdisciplinary symposium on Saturday organized by the GW Digital Humanities Institute at George Washington University (Washington, DC) on Saturday entitled “Global Chaucer and Shakespeare in a Digital World.” Visit the symposium website for full information [and note the informational flyer below]. The symposium features José Francisco Botelho (Brazilian translator of both Chaucer and Shakespeare) among many other exciting folks! The conference in DC is FREE and open to the public.

After the DC event, Botelho will continue on to Connecticut for a conversation about his Contos da Cantuária.

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Article: Miller’s Tale and Chinese Culture

by JONATHAN HSY

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Collage of images: English gentleman (early modern printed text), a Confucian scholar (modern drawing), and examples of ancient Chinese seal script. [original image here]

Several blog postings relating to Chaucer in Chinese contexts have appeared on this blog (see here, here, and here), and we are happy to draw attention to another resource:

Xiaolei Sun (孙晓蕾), a doctoral student at Shanghai International Studies University (and currently a visiting scholar at the University of Leeds), recently discovered this blog and kindly informed us of her article “When Fabliau Humour in Chaucer’s The Miller’s Prologue and Tale meets Chinese Translation and Culture,” published in the White Rose College of Arts & Sciences Journal (Universities of Leeds, Sheffield & York, 18 May 2016).

You can read the article online or download it as a PDF.

Beyond the Anglophone Inner Circle of Chaucer Studies [cross posting]

by JONATHAN HSY

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Outdoor portrait of Candace Barrington (2016).

Just posted today at the In The Middle blog: a timely, topical piece by Candace Barrington (co-director of Global Chaucers) on the importance of moving Chaucer Studies beyond the “Anglophone Inner Circle.” (Her posting is part of series of papers originally presented at a session organized by Jeffrey J. Cohen at the New Chaucer Society Congress held in London in July 2016.)

To read this posting (and more context for the NCS session), visit the In The Middle blog.

Global Chaucers events today (NCS London 2016)

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For people in London attending the 2016 Congress of the New Chaucer Society at Queen Mary: Two Global Chaucers events today!

[Open for NCS Delegates]
Roundtable: Translating Global Chaucers
NCS session 6G, People’s Palace 1 (Thread: Uses of the Medieval)
Wednesdy 13 July, 9-10:30am
Twitter hashtags: #NCS16 #s6g #globalchaucers

Organizer and Chair: Candace Barrington, Central Connecticut State University

1. Stephanie Downes, University of Melbourne, “Vilains mots! Nineteenth-Century French Translations of the Canterbury Tales”

2. Marcin Ciura, Independent Translator, “In the Margins of the Polish Parlement of Foules”

3. Züleyha Çetiner-Ōktem, Ege University, “Reinventing Chaucer’s Sir Thopas from a Turkish Perspective”

4. Denise Ming-yueh Wang, National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan, “When Global Chaucers Go Local: Reading Chaucer in Taiwan”

[Public Event]
Herkne and Rede: Poetry Reading by Patience Agbabi
Arts 2 Lecture Theatre, Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) Campus
Wednesday 13 July, 8-9pm

Convener: Candace Barrington, Central Connecticut State University

Patience Agbabi is former Poet Laureate of Canterbury. Telling Tales (Canongate, 2014), in which she disperses Chaucerian narratives in present-day multiethnic London, was shortlisted for the Ted Hughes Award for New Work in Poetry. Her work appears also in the anthology The Refugee Tales (Comma Press, 2016). She will  deliver an interactive reading “Herkne and Rede” that explores poetry performance as dynamic adaptation.

Refugee Tales: ebook available now!

by JONATHAN HSY

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Cover of Refugee Tales (forthcoming from Comma Press, 2016).

Refugee Tales is now available for purchase as an e-book (or pre-order a hard copy)!

This collection includes the contributions by Patience Agbabi (former Poet Laureate of Canterbury and author of Chaucerian remix Telling Tales), as well as other artists and storytellers from varied backgrounds. (We’ve mentioned Agbabi’s work throughout various blog posts, and you can read more about the “Refugee Tales” project here; see also my related posting on the global refugee crisis at In The Middle.)

Refugee Tales is a multi-voiced collection that conveys “the frighteningly common experiences of Europe’s new underclass – its refugees. … Presenting their accounts anonymously, as modern day counterparts to the pilgrims’ stories in Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, this book offers rare, intimate glimpses into otherwise untold suffering” (read more on the Comma Press website).

I’ve already acquired the e-book and can already say that the poetry and stories in this book are at once beautiful, provocative, and moving.

Note all profits from this book go to the Gatwick Detainee Welfare Group and Kent Help for Refugees.

Note there are many events happening in July 2016 (before and throughout the New Chaucer Society Congress in London) relating to the Refugee Tales project; see event listing here (note the forum and various scheduled legs of the walk, a “reverse” pilgrimage along the route from Canterbury to Westminster).

Upcoming events of interest:

Friday, 8 July 2016: Presentations from Refugee Tales at the Institute of Contemporary Arts in London. Ali Smith,”The Detainees Tale”; David Herd, “The Prologue;” and Patience Agbabi, “The Refugee’s Tale.” [Book tickets here – SOLD OUT as of 10 June]

Wednesday, 13 July 2016: Reading by Patience Agbabi coinciding with the New Chaucer Society Congress in London; she will deliver an interactive reading entitled “Herkne and Rede” drawing from Telling Tales that explores poetry performance as dynamic adaptation. [This is a public event. Scroll to the end of this schedule; more info will be forthcoming on this blog]

A New Look and Updates!

By JONATHAN HSY

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If you’ve visited recently, you may have noticed a few changes to the Global Chaucers website. We’re trying out a new look at the moment, but all the web content remains the same. The master list of modern Chaucer translations and adaptations (last updated in February 2015) has just now been updated with the addition of a hundred new items.

Newly identified items have been added for the following countries/languages:

Argentina/Spanish
Australia/English
Belgium/Dutch
Belgium/French
Canada/English
Colombia/Spanish
Czech Republic/Czech [incl. former Czechoslovakia]
Eritrea/English
Finland/Finnish
France/French
Germany/German
Hungary/Hungarian
India/English
India/Hindi
India/Tamil
Italy/Italian
Japan/Japanese
Mexico/Spanish
Netherlands/Dutch
Netherlands/Frisian
Romania/Romanian
Russia/Russian
South Africa/Afrikaans
South Korea/Korean
Spain/Catalan
Spain/Spanish (Castilian)
Sweden/Swedish
Turkey/Turkish
United Kingdom: England/English
United Kingdom: Scotland/Scots
United States/English

Feel free to consult the master list and if you notice any errors or are able to provide any of the missing information, please let us know!

Papal visit and other items of interest

by JONATHAN HSY

Left: Papal visit swag on sale at George Washington University. Right: Screenshot of Carolin Bergvall's recordings at PennSound
Left: Papal visit swag currently on sale at George Washington University. Right: Screenshot of Caroline Bergvall’s recordings at PennSound (September 24, 2015).

As I sit in my office this morning writing this blog post, the Pope is addressing a joint session of the US Congress on the other side of town (follow the live-streaming of the speech here). After concluding this visit, the Pope will continue on a busy itinerary through Philadelphia and New York.

To mark this occasion, check out Caroline Bergvall’s Chaucerian/BBC mashup about a previous (2006) papal visit: “The Summer Tale (Deus Hic, 1).” Both the text and a voice recording can be accessed at PennSound.

(For more information on the papal visit and DC-area sites relevant for papal history and Franciscan culture, see my blog post at In The Middle.)

Other topical items of interest:

A blog posting about medievalist responses to the global refugee crisis, with a nod to Chaucer pedagogy (with a passing reference to Bergvall’s work Drift, which evocatively refracts the current refugee crisis by way of the Old English poem The Seafarer).

In The Middle is promoting a special discount for two important books on medievalism (recently published by Boydell & Brewer)!